navigation navigation navigation navigation navigation navigation navigation navigation navigation navigation
navigation navigation navigation navigation navigation navigation navigation navigation navigation navigation
 

Q : Are the Virgin Islands Part of the United States ?

A : Yes, The Virgin Islands are a U.S. territory. As such its residents are entitled to U.S. passports and certain privileges like any mainland resident. Cargo made in the USA is not subject to customs duty.

Q : What Islands make up the Virgin Islands ?

A : The U.S. Virgin Islands are comprised of:

St. Croix – the largest of the three islands

St. Thomas – the second largest and the capital, Charlotte Amalie

St. John - the third largest of the islands

Water Island – the smallest of the islands

The British Virgin Islands consist of Tortola, Virgin Gorda, and a host of other small islands. These islands are not U.S. territories and are subject to different import laws.

Q : If the U.S. Virgin Islands are a U.S. territory, why do I need a broker?

A : The Virgin Islands are considered in a different customs jurisdiction than the US mainland and Puerto Rico. Any cargo originating from outside of the Virgin Islands is required to be cleared through U.S. customs. Foreign made cargo is subject to a customs duty up to 6% of the invoice value. Foreign made shipments with over $2,000.00 in value are required to file a consumption entry.

Q : What is excise tax?

A : Excise tax equates to a product sales tax. The rules for excise tax regarding who and what are taxable, are very broad. Certain institutions are tax-free by nature. Others are taxable by nature. The only way to determine the tax liability situation is to provide the consignee name and commodity. The excise tax is usually 4.2% of the invoice value, but can be as much as 10% of the invoice value.

Q: Are personal effects taxable and dutiable?

A: There is no requirement to pay excise tax on personal items. However, new items are applicable to customs duty, depending on the value and nature of the shipment. All foreign made items are taxable up to 6% of the invoice value.

Q : What should I expect on a Vehicle Import?

A: Top of the line Transport works with the client in facilitating the vehicle import procedure. Normally, the importer will need to visit 6 different offices before the vehicle is registered for the road. This procedure is lengthy and frustrating, because each office requires something different from the importer. That's why we include this as part of our service.

Q : Is there a wrong time to import products to the USVI?

A: Everything that is imported to the U.S. and British Virgin Islands need to be cleared through customs and excise tax, therefore when these departments are closed, your shipment stops moving. Luckily they never remain closed for more than 4 days at a time during the holiday period.

Q : Are A C S / AE C / A C H / ABI / AMS in the Virgin Islands ?

A : None of the above is in use in the Virgin Islands. Customs and Border Protection has not initiated any of these programs to date. All customs transactions (except alerts) are completed manually in the presence of an officer. It increases the time necessary to complete the transaction, but the system works.

Q : Is Pre-clearance of Shipments allowed?

A : Pre-clearance of shipments is generally not allowed. Exceptions are made based on the circumstances of individual shipments.

Q : What documents are necessary to clear a shipment?

A: For all shipments requiring clearance, a commercial invoice is necessary, stating the country of origin, the number of units, the unit cost and the extended cost. The invoice must be in English, the descriptions must be in layman's terms, and a company representative must sign the invoice. The invoice is the most crucial document. Anything else that is needed should be able to be created locally.

Q : Do the U.S. Virgin Islands use the Harmonized Tariff Schedule?

A: Yes, The U.S. Virgin Islands use the tariff, but our duty amount is different from what is stated in the schedule. To arrive at the applicable duty amount, our broker identifies the TEUSA number in the tariff schedule, but pays a different percentage than what is stated in the schedule. In the U.S. Virgin Islands, a maximum of 6% is paid on foreign made items. The British Virgin Islands does not use the harmonized tariff schedule and goods imported there normally pay a much higher duty amount.

 

 
 
 
 
 
social media

Home | HHG Moving | Vehicle Shipping | Freight Forwarding | Packing | Intransit Insurance | FAQ | Testimonials| Contact Us

Top Of The Line Transport - All Rights Reserved

This site is best viewed with Internet Exporler 7.0 or FireFox at Display view 1024X768